Young Worker Toolbox Talks

Young Worker Toolbox Talks

15 minutes at the start of every work day can go a long way in supporting your Occupational Health and Safety Program. These mini guides will help you to facilitate job specific discussions about safety. Your students, young workers, new workers, and apprentices can follow along with their own student version, which they can keep and review as needed.

INSTRUCTOR GUIDE: Manual and Power Tool Safety

05/01/2019

The tools of the trade for woodworkers, from hand tools to power screwdrivers, sanders, and saws, all have the potential to cause serious injury. Note: This is just an overview - specific safety instruction should be provided with training on each tool and piece of equipment.

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INSTRUCTOR GUIDE: Handling and Lifting

05/01/2019

Improper handling and lifting of heavy or bulky objects are a major source of back injuries. These injuries can affect your quality of life for weeks, months, or even years, preventing you from working or doing many things you enjoy. Lifting injuries are preventable.

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INSTRUCTOR GUIDE: Eye Injuries

05/01/2019

The loss of an eye can change a worker’s life forever and even prevent them from getting some jobs. Eyes are very sensitive and delicate. Injuries that look and seem minor can turn serious if not treated properly. Eye injuries can be very painful, and take months to heal. Most eye injuries can be prevented with the use of personal protective equipment.

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INSTRUCTOR GUIDE: Exposure to Airborne Contaminants

05/01/2019

Many woodworking tasks produce airborne materials that can damage the lungs if inhaled. Some materials (like solvents and adhesives) are toxic, making workers feel sick immediately, while others cause long-term lung damage. Exposure to wood dust is associated with a variety of adverse effects on the lungs including asthma and chronic bronchitis.

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INSTRUCTOR GUIDE: WHMIS

05/01/2019

Many chemicals used in hair salons can cause conditions ranging from minor skin irritation to serious injury and disease. If workers are expected to work with hazardous materials, their employer is required to inform them that the materials are hazardous and train the workers in their safe use. All NT and NU workplaces that use materials identified as hazardous (“controlled products”) by the Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) are required to follow the WHMIS system. The system uses consistent labelling to help workers recognize hazardous materials. The system and labels provide specific information on handling, storing, disposing, and 1st aid procedures of hazardous materials.

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INSTRUCTOR GUIDE: Violence and Harassment

05/01/2019

Violent incidents can occur without warning, especially in the service industry. Violence can be physical harm or threat of physical harm. Harassment can be any unwelcome comment or conduct that is unsettling. The incidents can be between a customer and a worker, between workers, or between a worker and the employer. Often the incidents take the form of verbal harassment, which may not have physical consequences, but can cause anxiety, depression, and strain on the mental health of the worker. Serious violent incidents are rare, but can be severe, such as head injuries, gun shot or knife wounds, broken bones, or death.

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INSTRUCTOR GUIDE: Scalds and Burns

05/01/2019

Scalds and burns are common in hair salons. Although most of these injuries are minor, they can be extremely painful, can take a long time to heal, and can leave scars if not cared for properly.

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INSTRUCTOR GUIDE: Musculoskeletal Injuries (MSIs)

05/01/2019

Hair stylists and other workers in the service sector perform tasks in uncomfortable positions for extended periods of time, and may repeat the same movements. These tasks can put strain on the body and can result in musculoskeletal injuries (MSIs). MSIs are injuries or disorders of the muscles, tendons, ligaments, joints, nerves, or blood vessels. Some common MSIs include muscle or tendon strains, ligament sprains, and tendonitis. Signs and symptoms of MSIs include redness, swelling, numbness, tingling, stiffness, pain, and difficulty moving a particular body part. Signs and symptoms may appear suddenly, or they may develop over a long period of time. Employers are required to identify risks of MSIs and to control or eliminate them where possible.

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INSTRUCTOR GUIDE: Bloodborne Pathogens

05/01/2019

Hair stylists can be exposed to blood-borne pathogens and therefore need to be aware of how these pathogens are transmitted, how to protect themselves, and how to protect their clients. Hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and HIV are blood-borne diseases. They are only spread through direct contact with the body fluids, particularly blood, of an infected person. They are not spread through casual contact such as hand-shaking, or using the same facilities (toilets, sinks, telephones, dishes). Workers are at risk of infection if infected body fluids come in contact with the tissues lining your eyes, nose, mouth, or with a cut in your skin, or if you are cut with an implement that is contaminated with infected blood.

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INSTRUCTOR GUIDE: Scalds and Burns

05/01/2019

Burns and scalds are a very common injury in the kitchen. While some burns may only require first aid, 3rd degree burns require hospitalization and at times cosmetic surgery. All scalds and burns are preventable.

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INSTRUCTOR GUIDE: Lockout

05/01/2019

Workplace injuries can be caused by unexpected energization or start-up of machines or equipment, or a release of stored energy. The purpose of de-energization and lockout is to prevent the release of energy that could cause injury or death. A lockout is used to make sure that equipment is not accidentally or inadvertently turned on while workers are performing maintenance on it. Maintenance is any work performed to keep machinery or equipment clean and in safe operating condition, that includes cleaning, repairing, and lubricating the equipment, as well as clearing obstructions to the normal flow of material.

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INSTRUCTOR GUIDE: Knives and Sharp Tools

05/01/2019

Knives and other sharp-edged tools, such as meat slicers, are essential equipment for the culinary artist, but they’re also the cause of many injuries, both minor and severe. Following safe work procedures and arranging the workspace to provide a safe environment will decrease the chances of losing time from work or losing a finger.

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INSTRUCTOR GUIDE: Housekeeping

05/01/2019

Good “housekeeping,” or keeping your workspace clean and tidy, is a basic part of accident and injury prevention. Effective housekeeping can eliminate a variety of workplace hazards. Poor housekeeping can contribute to accidents by hiding hazards that can cause injuries. In the kitchen, it can also be the source of food poisoning or transmission of viruses such as hepatitis, or bacteria such as E.coli.Housekeeping includes keeping work areas neat and orderly, properly cleaning surfaces, keeping walkways and floors free of slip and trip hazards, and removing waste materials, such as packaging, from work areas.

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INSTRUCTOR GUIDE: Working on Tires

05/01/2019

Auto mechanics often work on tires, but are often unaware that tire repair can be hazardous and even fatal. Inflated tires contain an enormous amount of stored energy. Improper handling and assembly of the tire or rim/wheel can cause components to explode.

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INSTRUCTOR GUIDE: Lockout / Tag Out

05/01/2019

Workplace injuries can be caused by unexpected energization start-up of machines or equipment, as well as release of stored energy. The purpose of de-energization and lockout is to prevent the release of energy that could cause injury or death. A lock or locks are used to make sure that equipment is not accidentally or inadvertently turned on while workers are performing maintenance on it. Maintenance is any work performed to keep machinery or equipment in a safe operating condition. This includes installing, repairing, cleaning, and lubricating the equipment, as well as clearing obstructions to the normal flow of material.

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INSTRUCTOR GUIDE: Auto Lift or Hoist

05/01/2019

Auto lifts have the potential to cause serious injury and death. Students must be trained in safe work procedures before using a lift or hoist. The Regulation (Section 12.78) requires that auto lifts be inspected and tested at least monthly.

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INSTRUCTOR GUIDE: Batteries

05/01/2019

Every vehicle you work on will have a battery, and it is easy to forget how dangerous they can be. Batteries contain sulphuric acid, which is very corrosive. They also contain oxygen/hydrogen gases, which can be explosive. They produce electrical energy that can quickly make metal tools burning hot if there is shorting between battery terminals. Finally, they are heavy and awkward to lift.

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Manual and Power Tool Safety

05/01/2019

The tools of the trade for woodworkers have the potential to cause serious injury, particularly if they are not taken care of or used without due caution.

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Handling and Lifting

05/01/2019

Improper handling and lifting of heavy or bulky objects are a major source of back injuries. These injuries can affect your quality of life for weeks, months, or even years. Back injuries can prevent you from working or doing many things you enjoy. Lifting injuries are preventable.

PDF icon English (902.52 KB) PDF icon Français (907.77 KB)

Eye Injuries

05/01/2019

The loss of an eye can change your life forever and even prevent you from getting some jobs. Minor eye injuries can be very painful, and take months to heal. A serious eye injury could lead to the loss of vision, or even your entire eye. Most eye injuries can be prevented with controls such as following the safe work procedures, using the correct machine guards, and the use of personal protective equipment.Your employer is responsible for determining what type of eye protection you need to do your task safely. This might include safety glasses with or without side shields, or goggles with or without ventilation. Proper safety equipment can protect you from hazards that can injure or irritate your eyes.

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Exposure to Airborne Contaminants

05/01/2019

Many woodworking tasks produce very fine dust particles or gases, which get into the air. Breathing in the affected air can make you sick, or damage your lungs. You may notice this right away, or it could be years before you begin experiencing difficulty breathing.

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WHMIS

05/01/2019

Many chemicals used in hair salons can cause conditions from minor skin irritation to serious injury and disease. These chemicals might be common products that you find even in homes, like bleach and bathroom cleaner. Or, they might be found only in your work place, like hair dye and antiseptic cleaner for your tools.Employers are required to inform their staff of hazardous materials in the workplace, and train the workers in their safe use. All NT and NU workplaces that use materials identified as hazardous (“controlled products”) by the Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) are required to follow the WHMIS system. WHMIS uses clear and consistent labels to help people recognize hazardous materials. It also provides specific information on handling, storing and disposing of these materials.

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Violence and Harassment

05/01/2019

Working in the service industry often places you directly with the public, this can be wonderful, but it also increases possibility of violent incidents in the workplace. Violent incidents can occur without warning. The incidents can be between a customer or criminal and a worker, between workers, or between a worker and the employer. Often the incidents take the form of verbal harassment, which may not have physical consequences, but can cause anxiety and depression for the worker. Serious violent incidents are rare, but can be severe.

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Scalds and Burns

05/01/2019

Scalds and burns are common in hair salons. Most of these injuries are relatively minor, but can be extremely painful, take a long time to heal, and can leave scarring if not cared for properly.

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Musculoskeletal Injuries (MSIs)

05/01/2019

A musculoskeletal injury is an injury or disorder of the muscles, tendons, ligaments, joints, nerves, or blood vessels due to overexertion, repetitive motions, or uncomfortable postures. Some common MSIs include muscle or tendon strains, ligament sprains, and tendonitis.

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Bloodborne Pathogens

05/01/2019

Hairdressers and their clients can be exposed to viruses and bacteria that can cause diseases such as HIV, AIDS, and hepatitis. These diseases can be life-threatening and are more common than one might anticipate. If you cut the hair of 12 clients a day, you’ll come into contact with someone with hepatitis C 40 times in one year. Pathogens are spread by direct contact with the body fluids, particularly blood, of an infected person.

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Scalds and Burns

05/01/2019

When you are working in a kitchen, sources for scalds and burns are always around you. These injuries are very painful, can take a long time to heal, and can be lifelong sources of pain, disfigurement, and disability.

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Lockout

05/01/2019

Lockout means that you are cutting off the power supply to a piece of equipment. You can do this by turning off a master switch, or just by unplugging it. Equipment that is not properly locked out can accidentally be turned on, which can result in severe injuries or even death. The most common injuries are severed fingers and crushed limbs, but injuries are sometimes fatal.

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Knives and Sharp Tools

05/01/2019

Knives and other sharp tools, such as meat slicers, are essential for kitchen workers, but they are also the cause of many injuries. Paying close attention, and good housekeeping will help keep you safe from minor cuts, and maybe even losing a finger.

PDF icon English (1.06 MB) PDF icon Français (1.12 MB)

Housekeeping

05/01/2019

Good “housekeeping”, keeping your workspace clean and tidy and your tools in good order, is a basic part of accident and injury prevention. Effective housekeeping must be part of your entire work day. Cleaning up at the end of the day is not enough. Good housekeeping means tidying after every task, and putting away equipment as soon as you are finished.

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Working on Tires

05/01/2019

Auto mechanics often work on tires, but may be unaware that repairing tires can be extremely hazardous and even fatal.

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Working Around the Service Pit

05/01/2019

Many vehicle repair centers still have service pits for inspecting and repairing the underside of vehicles without using a hoist. Working around a service pit requires extra caution at all times.

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Lockout / Tag Out

05/01/2019

Lockout means to physically neutralize all energy in a piece of equipment to ensure that machinery or equipment won’t start while a worker is doing maintenance or repair. This can be done by turning off a master switch or by unplugging powered tools or equipment, physically placing a personal lock on an energy-isolating device and placing your tag there to notify other workers of the work being performed. Working on powered equipment that is not properly locked out can result in severe injuries and death. The most common injuries are severed fingers and crushed limbs, but injuries are sometimes fatal.

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Engine Safety

05/01/2019

Vehicle engines are powerful machines with many moving parts. They have the potential to cause serious injury, so care and attention is required at all times.

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Batteries

05/01/2019

Batteries are everywhere, including every car and truck. It is easy to forget how dangerous they can be, because we are around them all the time. Lead-acid batteries contain dangerous chemicals like hydrogen-oxygen gases and sulphuric acid. If they are not properly cared for, stored, or installed, batteries can pose a huge risk to workers and bystanders.

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Auto Lift or Hoist

05/01/2019

An auto lift (or hoist) is a piece of equipment that raises vehicles. Vehicles often need to be raised to do inspections and repairs. They are often hydraulically powered, and come in a variety of models, for vehicles of all sizes. Auto lifts and hoists have the potential to cause serious injury or death when not used safely.

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